Lifestyle

Woolly Bear Weather Prediction

Woolly Bear Weather Prediction

 The woolly bear is also called woolly worm or fuzzy worm. This adorable little guy holds the position of being able to forecast the coming winter weather. The Woolly Bear caterpillar has 13 distinct sections along its body of either rusty brown or black.  It is said, the wider the rusty brown sections (or the more brown sections there are), the milder the coming winter will be. The more black there is, the more severe the winter. 

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Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

The missing and murdered Indigenous women epidemic (MMIW) is a crisis issue currently affecting Indigenous people. This crisis affects the United States and Canada, including the First Nations, Inuit, Metis, FNM, and Native American communities. According to the National Institute of Justice, Native women experience violence of twice the rate of women in the U.S. in which over 1.5 million Native women have experienced violence, including sexual violence, in their lifetime. It is good to educate your children on the reality of this. Without awareness, there will never be change. Change begins with our generations and carries on over to the next generations.

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Ojibwe Influence to Respect Mother Earth

Ojibwe Influence to Respect Mother Earth

Water has always had an important place in the lives of the Ojibway. Our survival depends on water. I (Ayasha) have a deep spiritual responsibility to protect the purity of water. We, Ojibway people, have a history of identifying the relevance of water and fulfilling our obligation to both protect the water source and raise awareness about water issues.

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Hardships Ojibwe Native Americans Face in Bitter Cold Winters

Hardships Ojibwe Native Americans Face in Bitter Cold Winters

The hardships Ojibwe Native Americans faced in the past compared to the present are what makes the woodlands Ojibwe strong. Even to this day, some winter traditions can be found in the present within the tribe. 

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Cultural Winter Preservation for the Ojibwe

Cultural Winter Preservation for the Ojibwe

Cultural preservation for the Ojibwe is identified within our tribe as a living testament to the perseverance of culture, of the will to weather, even to bloom. Although our ancestors' spiritual practices were banned by Indian agents, priests, and missionaries, and Christianity was forced upon the people, our spiritual beliefs are thriving today because their spirit still remains within us. Something that can never be taken away from us is the gift of carrying an ancestors' sufferings, hardships, and will power to survive. 

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